Joint Anatomy

There are numerous joints which are involved when it comes to running, and I’m not just talkingJoint anatomy for runners in the legs and feet. The joints of the spine, and even as high as the shoulders and neck are affected, even with minor movements to stabilise the upper body. But if I were to cover all these areas we’d be here forever and to be honest, we’ve all got better things to do!

So, here I will cover the larger joints of the lower limb which are most commonly affected by injuries – the knee, hip and ankle. Smaller joints of the foot are covered on the foot and running page.

I believe it is important as a runner to have at least a basic understanding of the joint anatomy of the knee, ankle and hip as they are so frequently injured. Knowing the joint anatomy allows you to identify which structure may be under strain when a niggle starts to develop. Addressing the problem ASAP results in less, or even no time out with an injury!

The Hip Joint Anatomy

The hip joint is a ball and socket joint, joining the pelvis to the leg via the Femur. It is a pretty stable joint and doesn’t have as much movement as the similarly designed shoulder joint….more

The Knee Joint Anatomy

The knee is a hinge joint between the Femur (thigh) and Tibia (shin), although there is also a secondary joint which comes into play between the patella and these two bones – the Patellofemoral joint….more

The Ankle Joint Anatomy

The ankle joint is also known as the Talocrural joint due to it being formed by the talus at the bottom and the mortise formed by the Tibia and Fibula at the top. It allows the movements of plantarflexion, dorsiflexion, inversion and eversion….more

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